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Public Service

​Public and Community Service Studies

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Are you an idealist who wants to change the world? Want to be part of a dynamic, engaging learning community that connects your classes with real-world problem-solving? Hope to have a career that serves society? Then the Public & Community Service Studies (PSP) major is right for you!  

PSP offers an interdisciplinary curriculum focused on solving real-world problems. PSP students work closely with faculty and community partners to research and address complex issues and then reflect on this shared work to develop the leadership skills necessary for making positive social change. The dep​artment’s innovative curriculum, the first of its kind in the country, continues to make it a pioneer and leader in community engaged, experiential learning. ​

PSP offers introductory courses that are open to all students, as well as major and minor courses that cover central themes such as rebuilding democratic communities, re-thinking effective service, and organizing for social justice. The academic program is built on a collaborative teaching model with all of the courses integrating community engaged learning in an intentional way. With a dynamic group of faculty and community partners, students are asked to be co-creators of their learning. Students engage in a diverse range of community work including direct service, community organizing, community development, and public policy. In the process, students develop 21st century skills like public speaking, community building, working across cultural boundaries, organizational development, policy analysis, and collaborative research.

​​​​"Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world are the ones who do."

​-Steve Jobs​​

 Student News

chisolm.jpgCassandra M. Chislom ’17 (Boston, Mass.) is collected books for high school students as a component of Humanity in Action​. The month​long summer program brings together international groups of college students and recent college graduates to explore national histories of injustice and how those histories — along with current political and economic situations — impact minority groups today. As part of the program, fellows are asked to design an action project that will impact the community.